Male Hormone Panel

$179.99

Monitoring your hormone levels is necessary to reduce the chance of undesirable side effects and to optimize your treatment choice. You can even take these results to your healthcare provider and they can use the information to gain a better understanding of your current and create a treatment plan.

Hormone discrepancies in men can contribute to:

  • Decreased libido
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sleep problems
  • Decreased muscle mass and strength
  • General fatigue/decreased energy
  • Hair loss or thinning
  • Increased body fat percentage
  • Urinary problems
  • Decreased bone density or osteoporosis
  • Irritability and depression

 

Why use our Male Hormone Panel?

  • It is affordable and less expensive than a doctor visit.
  • Noninvasive testing can be collected anywhere, any time.
  • Results are reflective hormone levels and needs.
  • Results can lead to a supplement plan to enhance hormone production.

 

Why is it important to measure male hormones?

Optimal health depends heavily on balancing hormones, rather than just one, single hormone. Measurements of hormones can be used to:

  1. Estimate the body’s hormone production as a baseline test prior to any supplemental intervention
  2. To monitor levels of hormones during and after hormone or supplementation treatment

Monitoring your hormone levels is necessary to reduce the chance of undesirable side effects and to optimize your treatment choice.

You can even take these results to your healthcare provider and they can use the information to gain a better understanding of your current and create a treatment plan.

 

The following 6 hormones are evaluated in the Male Hormone Panel (MHP):

  • Testosterone – This hormone is produced in the testes and is necessary for healthy reproductive function. Testosterone helps preserve lean body mass, bone density, cognitive function, and libido. Excessive amounts of testosterone can lead to hardening of the blood vessels, behavioral changes, prostate problems, and an increase in total cholesterol.
  • Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) – PSA is a protein produced by normal, as well as malignant, cells of the prostate gland. The PSA test measures the level of PSA in a man’s blood. Men with high PSA numbers are often at higher risk for prostate cancer.
  • Cortisol – Cortisol is a hormone that affects many organs in your body. It plays an important role in helping you to respond to stress, fight infection, regulate blood sugar, and regulate metabolism.
  • DHEA– A hormone produced in the adrenal glands is a precursor to testosterone and estrogen. Supplementation of DHEA is common in many people. Unmonitored intake can easily alter the balance between male and female hormones.
  • Estradiol (Estrogen) – Often thought of as “female hormones”, estrogens play important roles in men’s health too. Controlling estrogen levels can be helpful in treating the overall men’s health system. Estradiol is partially formed in the testes but mostly in the other body tissues from both the testicular and adrenal androgens. High estradiol levels have been associated with breast enlargement and obesity.
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) – Measurement of testosterone does not distinguish between bound and unbound (available) testosterone but, determines the overall amount of testosterone. However, if a person’s SHBG level is not in normal range, then the testosterone level may not be an accurate representation of the true amount of testosterone in the body.

Increased SHBG in men may be associated with symptoms of low testosterone levels because less testosterone is available to the body. Low testosterone leads to increased production of SHBG, further decreasing the amount of testosterone available

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